Category: Spoofing


7th Circuit Affirms 1st Conviction For Spoofing

Posted on August 16th, by and in Futures, General, Spoofing. Comments Off on 7th Circuit Affirms 1st Conviction For Spoofing

Spoofing is not going away after all. Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit unanimously upheld the first-ever criminal conviction for spoofing. The case, United States v. Coscia, 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, No. 16-3017, involved a multi-count indictment against futures trader Michael Coscia. The indictment alleged that Coscia engaged in illegal trading by employing computer algorithms that engaged in market activity that violated the anti-spoofing laws created and adopted as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. The indictment alleged that Coscia traded in a variety of futures products and made over $1.4 million as a result of his illegal trading.

By way of background, spoofing involves placing bids or offers to sell futures contracts with the intent to cancel the bids or offers before execution. By placing bids … Read More »


The CFTC Settles Another Spoofing Case

Posted on July 28th, by and in CFTC, Settlements, Spoofing. Comments Off on The CFTC Settles Another Spoofing Case

On July 26, 2017, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) issued an order finding that Simon Posen engaged in the “disruptive practice of ‘spoofing’ (bidding or offering with the intent to cancel the bid or offer before execution).” The CFTC’s findings, which spanned more than three years, beginning at least in December of 2011, indicated that Posen, based in New York City, had traded from his home, using his own account, in violation of Section 4c(a)(5)(C) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. § 6c(a)(5)(C)), which explicitly outlaws spoofing.

The CFTC found Posen placed thousands of orders in gold, silver, copper, and crude oil futures contracts with the intent to cancel them before execution. These orders were placed so as to move the market prices so that smaller orders, which he would also place on the other side of the … Read More »


The Future of Futures: High-Speed Trading and CFTC Regulation & Enforcement

Posted on June 30th, by and in CFTC, Enforcement, Futures, Non-prosecution Agreements, Reg AT, Regulations, Spoofing. Comments Off on The Future of Futures: High-Speed Trading and CFTC Regulation & Enforcement

The future is now.

On June 29, 2017, the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry voted overwhelmingly to confirm the nomination of J. Christopher Giancarlo as Chairman of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”), paving the way for his nomination to move forward to consideration on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Within two hours of this announcement, the CFTC announced its first non-prosecution agreements. These agreements and the related “spoofing” cases are discussed in more detail below. These same-day announcements reflect the advancing ambitious agenda outlined by Acting Chairman Giancarlo in his speech entitled “CFTC: A New Direction Forward,” given on March 15, 2017. Acting Chairman Giancarlo has since taken every opportunity to advise the industry of his goals to reduce regulatory burdens, modernize the agency, and maintain the CFTC’s aggressive enforcement efforts. All the while, the … Read More »


Jim Lundy Appointed as Independent Monitor in the CFTC v. 3Red Trading & Oystacher Manipulative Trading / Spoofing Matter

Posted on December 22nd, by in CFTC, Civil Penalties, Enforcement, Manipulation, Settlements, Spoofing. Comments Off on Jim Lundy Appointed as Independent Monitor in the CFTC v. 3Red Trading & Oystacher Manipulative Trading / Spoofing Matter

Chicago partner Jim Lundy was appointed by the Honorable Judge Amy J. St. Eve of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois to serve as the independent monitor for one of the first “spoofing” manipulative trading enforcement actions instituted by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). Jim’s appointment is part of a settlement between the CFTC and 3Red Trading LLC and its principal, Igor B. Oystacher, entered on December 20, 2016. Over the next three years, Jim will be responsible for monitoring the trading of 3Red and Oystacher, and identifying any future violations of the Commodity Exchange Act and CFTC Regulations as charged and pursuant to a monitoring agreement.

The CFTC filed its initial complaint on October 19, 2015. In its complaint, the CFTC alleged the employment of manipulative trading / spoofing by the Defendants in the markets … Read More »


Department of Justice Obtains Its Second Spoofing Conviction and Its Novel Cooperation Agreement.

Posted on November 21st, by and in Cooperation, Spoofing. Comments Off on Department of Justice Obtains Its Second Spoofing Conviction and Its Novel Cooperation Agreement.

On the heels of its successful prosecution of Michael Coscia for spoofing, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) recently secured a guilty plea and cooperation agreement in another high-profile “spoofing” case. By way of background, spoofing is the illegal practice of placing trades on the bid or offer side of a market with the intent to cancel them before execution in order to manipulate prices for personal gain. On November 9, 2016, Londoner Navinder Singh Sarao pleaded guilty to two criminal charges after losing his battle against extradition from the UK.  Despite being charged with 22 counts, including wire fraud, commodities fraud, and spoofing, Mr. Sarao pleaded guilty to just two counts—one count of wire fraud, 18 U.S.C. § 1343 (which carries a maximum of 20 years’ imprisonment and a fine of $250,000) and one count of spoofing, 7 U.S.C. § … Read More »


Co-Owner of an Unregistered New Jersey Brokerage Firm Settles “Spoofing” Charges

Posted on April 10th, by and in Layering, Manipulation, Spoofing. Comments Off on Co-Owner of an Unregistered New Jersey Brokerage Firm Settles “Spoofing” Charges

The SEC filed a settled administrative proceeding against an owner of a New Jersey based brokerage firm for engaging in an illegal “layering” or “spoofing” scheme that resulted in unlawful profits of almost $1 million. See SEC press release.

Market manipulation always has been a high priority for the SEC’s Enforcement Division and encompasses a broad range of activities that distort the natural forces of supply and demand. “Layering” or “spoofing” manipulation schemes involve placing a series of non-bona fide orders and then immediately canceling the orders before they are executed. These schemes create the illusion of demand resulting in an artificial increase in the market price of a security. The activity generally spurs the interest of other investors who place orders—thinking that the stock is “hot” and the increased activity is legitimate. After the manipulator stops entering orders, the price … Read More »




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