Ninth Circuit: You Don’t Need to Report Securities Violations to the SEC to Be Protected by the Dodd-Frank Anti-Retaliation Provision

Posted on March 10th, by and in Dodd-Frank, SEC Guidance, Whistleblower. Comments Off on Ninth Circuit: You Don’t Need to Report Securities Violations to the SEC to Be Protected by the Dodd-Frank Anti-Retaliation Provision

On March 8, 2017, a divided panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that the anti-retaliation provision of the Dodd-Frank Act protects individuals who make purely internal disclosures of alleged securities violations. The decision, Somers v. Digital Realty Trust, Inc., No. 15-17352 (9th Cir. March 8, 2017), aligns the Ninth Circuit with the Second Circuit, which reached the same result in Berman v. Neo@ogilvy, LLC, 801 F.3d 145 (2d Cir. 2015). These opinions stand in stark contrast to the position of the Fifth Circuit, which concluded in Asadi v. G.E. Energy (USA), L.L.C., 720 F.3d 620 (5th Cir. 2013), that in order to enjoy the protection of the anti-retaliation provision an individual must report the alleged securities violation to the SEC. While the Ninth Circuit’s decision is the latest entry in this evolving circuit … Read More »


The SEC Heightens Its Interest in Robo-Advisers

Posted on March 3rd, by , and in Guidance, OCIE, Robo-advisers. Comments Off on The SEC Heightens Its Interest in Robo-Advisers

Over the last two weeks, the SEC has put robo-advisers on notice that they are on the staff’s radar. First, on February 23, 2017, the SEC’s Division of Investment Management, along with the SEC’s Office of Compliance, Inspections, and Examinations, issued a Guidance Update for robo-advisers. The term “robo-adviser” refers to registered automated investment advisers that provide investment advice that uses computer algorithms. Robo-advisers generally collect information about a client’s financial goals, income, assets, investment horizon, and risk tolerance by way of an online or electronic questionnaire. With limited human interaction, robo-advisers use this information to create and manage investment portfolios for clients. Robo-advisers are often more economical than traditional investment advisers. Robo-advisers, which began as an appeal to millennials, are now widely becoming popular with all age groups and types of investors.

The Guidance Update focused on in three unique … Read More »


Update: SCOTUS Will Consider Statute of Limitations on Disgorgement

Posted on January 18th, by and in Civil Penalties, Disgorgement, Statute of Limitations. Comments Off on Update: SCOTUS Will Consider Statute of Limitations on Disgorgement

We previously wrote about how the SEC urged the Supreme Court to grant certiorari in Kokesh v. SEC, and on Friday, January 13, the Court did just that. In an order without comment, the Court granted certiorari after both the petitioner and the SEC requested the Court’s review, albeit for different reasons. While the petitioner believes he should not be subject to disgorgement for ill-gotten gains that were obtained more than five years ago, the SEC wants the Court to bring clarity to the circuit split that has developed since the Eleventh Circuit’s decision in SEC v. Graham, which held that the five-year statute of limitations applies to disgorgement. As we previously noted, the SEC argued that Graham impedes its ability to achieve uniformity in the administration of securities laws.

We will continue to monitor developments in this case, which is … Read More »


Congresswoman Seeks to Add Accountability to SEC Regulations, Past and Future

Posted on January 17th, by and in Legislation, Regulations, Rule-Making. Comments Off on Congresswoman Seeks to Add Accountability to SEC Regulations, Past and Future

Republican Congresswoman Ann Wagner has sponsored the SEC Regulatory Accountability Act, H.R. 78, which requires the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to engage in more rigorous cost–benefit analysis before it can move forward with new regulations. Congresswoman Wagner called the bill “common-sense legislation” that regulators should already engage in.

Specifically, the Act requires the SEC to identify the nature, source, and significance of the problem each proposed regulation is intended to address; to adopt a regulation only after a reasoned determination that the regulation’s benefits justify its cost; to identify and assess available alternatives to additional regulation (including the alternative of not regulating); and to ensure that regulation is accessible and easy to understand. Under the Act, cost–benefit analysis requires the SEC to consider the impact of any regulation on investor choice, securities’ market liquidity, and small businesses. Costs and benefits … Read More »


Supreme Court Reaffirms Dirks and Tosses Prosecution a Win

Posted on December 8th, by and in Insider Trading. Comments Off on Supreme Court Reaffirms Dirks and Tosses Prosecution a Win

In Salman v. United States, 580 U.S. __ (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Bassam Salman’s conviction, giving prosecutors a win on the first insider trading case to be heard by the Court in nearly two decades. The unanimous decision, written by Justice Samuel Alito, is short and to the point. The Court reaffirmed the continued validity of Dirks v. S.E.C., 463 U.S. 646 (1983), and determined that a tipper receives a personal benefit by providing insider information to a “trading relative or friend.”

In Dirks, the Court ruled that a tippee’s liability for trading on inside information hinges on whether the tipper breached a fiduciary duty by disclosing the information. The fiduciary duty is breached when the insider will personally benefit, directly or indirectly, from his disclosure. In Salman, the Supreme Court stated that the benefit did not have to … Read More »


SEC Affirms Commitment to FCPA Enforcement Actions

Andrew J. Ceresney, Director of the Division of Enforcement, reaffirmed the SEC’s focus on FCPA enforcement actions at the International Conference on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Mr. Ceresney’s speech focused on companies’ need to self-report violations.

Mr. Ceresney stated that the SEC uses “a carrot and stick approach to encouraging cooperation,” where self-reporting companies can receive reduced charges and deferred prosecution and non-prosecution agreements, while companies that do no self-report do not receive any reduction in penalties. Mr. Ceresney warned that “companies are gambling if they fail to self-report FCPA misconduct.”

Mr. Ceresney gave examples of how this policy has benefited companies recently. Mr. Ceresney highlighted the SEC’s decision not to bring charges against the Harris Corporation after it self-reported violations and mentioned to examples where the SEC entered into non-prosecution agreements as a result of self-reporting.

Mr. Cerseney stated that the … Read More »


SECurities Law Perspectives Nominated for 2016 Best Legal Blog Contest—We Need Your Help!

Posted on October 24th, by and in General. Comments Off on SECurities Law Perspectives Nominated for 2016 Best Legal Blog Contest—We Need Your Help!

We are proud to announce that SECurities Law Perspectives has been selected from thousands of nominations to be a part of The Expert Institute’s Best Legal Blog Contest.  We would appreciate your further support by casting your vote by clicking here!  Thank you, and we look forward to providing you with more updates soon.


EB-5 Program Proves to Be Fertile Ground for Securities Law Violations

Posted on September 6th, by and in EB-5 Program. Comments Off on EB-5 Program Proves to Be Fertile Ground for Securities Law Violations

The SEC has brought approximately 20 litigated or agreed enforcement actions since February 2013 that have involved securities offerings that were made in connection with the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program (the “EB-5 Program”). These enforcement actions have primarily charged that EB-5 sponsors have engaged in some sort of offering fraud or that an EB-5 sponsor improperly acted as an unregistered broker-dealer in connection with the sale of securities. Not only is the SEC devoting enforcement resources to this area, but in 2016, the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations also announced that it would allocate examination resources to a number of priorities, including private placements that involve the EB-5 Program.

The EB-5 Program. Congress created the EB-5 Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”), in 1990 to stimulate the U.S. economy and to provide foreign … Read More »


Third Circuit Defined “Investment Adviser” In Sentencing Appeal

Posted on August 18th, by and in Investment Advisers, SEC Guidance, Sentencing. Comments Off on Third Circuit Defined “Investment Adviser” In Sentencing Appeal

Everett C. Miller pleaded guilty to securities fraud after he sold more than $41 million in phony, unregistered promissory notes in his firm, Carr Miller Capital, LLC, that falsely promised high returns with no risk. As part of his plea, Miller and the government stipulated to what they considered to be an appropriate offense level under the United States Sentencing Guidelines (the “Guidelines”). At sentencing, however, the district court applied the four-level investment adviser enhancement provided for by the Guidelines for securities laws violations perpetrated by “investment advisers,” as that term is defined by the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, 15 U.S.C. § 80b-2(a)(11). See U.S.S.G. § 2B1.1(b)(19)(A)(iii). Due to the enhancement, Miller received a 120-month sentence.

On appeal, Miller challenged, among other things, the application of the investment adviser enhancement, arguing that he was not an “investment adviser” under the … Read More »


DC Circuit Upholds Constitutionality of SEC’s Use of Administrative Law Judges in First Appellate Ruling

Posted on August 11th, by and in Administrative Proceedings. Comments Off on DC Circuit Upholds Constitutionality of SEC’s Use of Administrative Law Judges in First Appellate Ruling

In the first appellate ruling of its kind, the District of Columbia Circuit upheld the SEC’s use of administrative law judges in administrative proceedings as constitutional. The court in Raymond J. Lucia Cos. v. SEC denied Mr. Lucia’s petition for review in which he claimed that the SEC’s use of administrative law judges was unconstitutional.

Lucia argued that administrative law judges are “Officers of the United States” within the meaning of the Appointments Clause in Article II of the Constitution. Lucia urged the court to rule that the SEC’s use of administrative law judges was unconstitutional because those judges have not been appointed by the President, as the Constitution requires. The three-judge panel disagreed and concluded that the SEC’s administrative law judges are inferior officers/employees who are not governed by the clause. In making this determination, the panel considered the significance … Read More »




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