SEC Awards More Than $4.1 Million to Whistleblower Despite a Finding that Whistleblower Unreasonably Delayed Reporting Misconduct

Posted on December 5th, by in Whistleblower. Comments Off on SEC Awards More Than $4.1 Million to Whistleblower Despite a Finding that Whistleblower Unreasonably Delayed Reporting Misconduct

The SEC announced earlier today that it has awarded more than $4.1 million to a former company employee who “alerted the agency to a widespread, multi-year securities law violation and continued to provide important information and assistance throughout the SEC’s investigation.” Press Rel. No. 2017-222. To determine an appropriate award amount, the SEC considers a number of criteria that are outlined in the Rule 21F-6 of the Exchange Act, including (1) the significance of the information provided to the Commission, (2) the assistance provided in the Commission action, (3) law enforcement interest in deterring violations by granting awards, (4) participation in internal compliance systems, (5) culpability, (6) unreasonable reporting delay, and (7) interference with internal compliance and reporting systems. 17 C.F.R. § 240.21F-6.


Ex-Executives Move to Compel Law Firm to Produce Notes from Internal Investigation

Posted on November 17th, by and in General. Comments Off on Ex-Executives Move to Compel Law Firm to Produce Notes from Internal Investigation

On October 31, 2017, two former executives from General Cable Corporation (“GCC”) filed a motion to compel Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP (“Morgan Lewis”) to produce interview memoranda and notes created during an internal investigation of GCC that were subsequently provided to the SEC and an independent auditor. In S.E.C. v. Herrera, et al., No. 17-20301 (S.D. Fla. filed Jan. 24, 2017), the government alleged that Mathias Francisco Sandoval Herrera (“Herrera”) and Maria D. Cidre (“Cidre”), acting as CEO and CFO of the Latin American operations of GCC, violated various securities laws when they “actively concealed from GCC executive management material inventory accounting errors at the company’s subsidiary in Brazil, including the overstatement of inventory by tens of millions of dollars and allegations of a massive theft by GCC Brazil employees.”


Split Second Circuit Affirms Insider Trading Conviction While Rejecting Newman’s “Meaningfully Close Personal Relationship” Requirement

Posted on August 28th, by and in Appellate Decision, Criminal Liability, General, Insider Trading. Comments Off on Split Second Circuit Affirms Insider Trading Conviction While Rejecting Newman’s “Meaningfully Close Personal Relationship” Requirement

On August 23, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit affirmed an insider trading conviction against a portfolio manager, and in doing so, held that the “meaningfully close personal relationship” requirement set forth in the Second Circuit’s landmark decision, United States v. Newman, to infer personal benefit “is no longer good law.”

Background

Matthew Martoma (“Martoma”) managed an investment portfolio at S.A.C. Capital Advisors, LLC (“SAC”) that focused on pharmaceutical and healthcare companies. His “conviction[] stem[s] from an insider trading scheme involving securities of two pharmaceutical companies, Elan Corporation, plc (“Elan”) and Wyeth, that were jointly developing an experimental drug called bapineuzumab to treat Alzheimer’s disease.” During the development of bapineuzumab, Martoma arranged for consultation visits paid by SAC with two doctors who were working on the clinical trial. One doctor was the chair of the safety monitoring … Read More »


11th Circuit Nixes CPA’s Claim That SEC Sanctions Preclude Criminal Prosecution

Posted on February 14th, by and in Accountants, Civil Penalties, Criminal Liability, General, Parallel Investigations. Comments Off on 11th Circuit Nixes CPA’s Claim That SEC Sanctions Preclude Criminal Prosecution

On February 3, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit rejected an accountant’s argument that the imposition of both criminal charges and SEC sanctions on the basis of the same alleged conduct violated the Fifth Amendment’s Double Jeopardy Clause. This appellate court ruling illustrates that defendants in SEC investigations and enforcement proceedings must be mindful that the imposition of civil penalties, disgorgement, and permanent bars do not preclude the prospect of criminal prosecution.

Thomas D. Melvin (“Melvin”), a certified public accountant, agreed in April 2013 to pay the SEC a civil penalty of $108,930 and disgorgement of $68,826 to settle alleged violations of Sections 10(b) and 14(e) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 and Rules 10b-5 and 14e-3 thereunder. According to the SEC, Melvin purportedly had disclosed confidential insider information that he received from a … Read More »


SEC Announces Record Number of Enforcement Actions Filed in FY 2016

Posted on October 14th, by in General, Guidance. Comments Off on SEC Announces Record Number of Enforcement Actions Filed in FY 2016

On October 11, 2016, the SEC announced its enforcement results for fiscal year 2016, which ended on September 30th. Press Release No. 2016-212. In total, the SEC continued its trend of increased enforcement activity by filing 868 enforcement actions, a new single-year high, which included “a record 548 standalone or independent enforcement actions” and “judgments and orders totaling more than $4 billion in disgorgement and penalties.” In comparison, the SEC filed 807 enforcement actions (507 standalone or independent actions) in fiscal year 2015, and 755 enforcement actions (413 standalone or independent actions) in fiscal year 2014. Touting its recent successes, SEC Chair Mary Jo White announced in the press release that “[o]ver the last 3 years, we have changed the way we do business on the enforcement front by using new data analytics to uncover fraud, enhancing our ability to … Read More »


Private Equity Fund Advisers Agree to Settle Charges of Improperly Disclosing Acceleration of Monitoring Fees and Improperly Supervising Expense Reimbursement Practices

Posted on August 25th, by and in Civil Penalties, Conflict of Interest, Fees, Investment Advisers, Neither Admit Nor Deny, Private Equity, Settlements. Comments Off on Private Equity Fund Advisers Agree to Settle Charges of Improperly Disclosing Acceleration of Monitoring Fees and Improperly Supervising Expense Reimbursement Practices

In a recent action, the SEC demonstrated its continuing focus on private equity fund advisers’ fees. On August 23, 2016, Apollo Management V, LP, Apollo Management VI, LP, Apollo Management VII, LP, and Apollo Commodities Management, LP (collectively, “Apollo”), agreed to settle charges brought by the SEC for “misleading fund investors about fees and a loan agreement and failing to supervise a senior partner who charged personal expenses to the funds” in violation of Sections 206 and 203 of the Advisers Act. Press Release No. 2016-165.

According to the SEC Order, Apollo advises a number of private equity funds that own multiple portfolio companies. Like most private equity fund advisers, Apollo charges annual management fees and certain other fees to the limited partners in its private equity funds and charges monitoring fees to certain portfolio companies under separate monitoring agreements. Release … Read More »


Registered Investment Advisor Agrees to Settle Charges of Failing to Clearly Disclose Transaction Costs Beyond “Wrap Fees” to Investors

Posted on July 19th, by and in Civil Penalties, Investment Advisers, Neither Admit Nor Deny, Settlements, Strict Liability. Comments Off on Registered Investment Advisor Agrees to Settle Charges of Failing to Clearly Disclose Transaction Costs Beyond “Wrap Fees” to Investors

On July 14, 2016, RiverFront Investment Group, LLC (“RiverFront”) agreed to settle charges brought by the SEC for failing to “properly prepare clients for additional transaction costs beyond the ‘wrap fees’ they pay to cover the cost of several services bundles together.” Press Release No. 2016-143. According to the SEC, participants in wrap fee programs usually pay an annual fee “which is intended to cover the cost of several services ‘wrapped’ together, such as custody, trade execution, portfolio management, and back office services.” Release No. 4453. The SEC found that under these wrap programs, a sponsoring firm will offer clients a selection of third-party managers, referred to as subadvisors, to have discretion over the clients’ investment decisions. When subadvisors execute trades on behalf of clients through a sponsor-designated broker-dealer, the transaction costs associated with the trades are included in the … Read More »


SEC Levies Disgorgement and Civil Penalties for Violations of the Consumer Protection Rule and the Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Protection Rule

Posted on June 27th, by and in Civil Penalties, Consumer Protection Rule, Cooperation, Self-Reporting, Settlements, Whistleblower. Comments Off on SEC Levies Disgorgement and Civil Penalties for Violations of the Consumer Protection Rule and the Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Protection Rule

On June 23, 2016, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated and Merrill Lynch Professional Clearing Corp. (collectively, “Merrill Lynch”) agreed to pay $415 million and admit wrongdoing to settle charges of rules based violations, including Exchange Act Rule 15c3-3, the Consumer Protection Rule (the “Consumer Protection Rule”) and Exchange Act Rule 21F-17 (“Rule 21F-17”), which prohibits any action impeding an individual from communicating directly with Commission staff about possible securities laws violations. See Release No. 78141.

Exchange Act Rule 15c3-3, known as the Consumer Protection Rule, was enacted to “protect broker-dealer customers in the event a broker dealer becomes insolvent” by eliminating the “use by broker-dealers of customer funds and securities to finance firm overhead and such firm activities a trading and underwriting through the separation of customer related activities from other broker-dealer operations.” To safeguard assets, the Consumer Protection … Read More »




From the Blog:

SEC Awards More Than $4.1 Million to Whistleblower Despite a Finding that Whistleblower Unreasonably Delayed Reporting Misconduct

The SEC announced earlier today that it has awarded more than $4.1 million to a former company employee who “alerted the agency to a...

Ex-Executives Move to Compel Law Firm to Produce Notes from Internal Investigation

On October 31, 2017, two former executives from General Cable Corporation (“GCC”) filed a motion to compel Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP (“Morgan Lewis”)...